Minimally Invasive Surgery

Minimally Invasive Surgery

The surgeons at University Surgeons Associates, PC are committed to providing minimally invasive solutions to your surgical problems.

We have been leaders in minimally invasive surgery in East Tennessee for decades. The first laparoscopic gall bladder surgery in the area was done by our surgeons. Since then the laparoscopic surgeries for gastroesophageal reflux, hernias, solid organ removal and now bariatric procedures have been introduced and are common place. The physicians of University Surgeons Associates, PC have sponsored and directed courses for practicing surgeons in:

  • Laparoscopic Biliary Surgery
  • Thoracoscopic Surgery
  • Advanced General Laparoscopic Surgery
  • Advanced Upper Gastrointestinal Laparoscopic Surgery
  • Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux Surgery with Vagotomy
  • Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication
  • Laparoscopic Solid Organ Surgery

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF LAPAROSCOPIC surgery?

In the past, making incisions in the abdomen, flank, or back was necessary for open surgical procedures. Today, with the technique known as minimally invasive surgery, many previously open surgical procedures can be performed laparoscopically through small 1/4-1/2 inch incisions or now even through a single incision site. Patients may leave the hospital sooner and return to work more quickly than patients recovering from open surgery.

Results of surgery may vary depending on the type of procedure and the patients’ overall condition. Common advantages are:

  • Less postoperative pain
  • Shorter hospital stay
  • Quicker return to normal activity
  • Improved cosmetic result
  • Reduced risk of herniation or wound separation

IS MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY RIGHT FOR YOU?

Although minimally invasive surgery has many benefits, it may not be appropriate for some patients. Obtain a thorough medical evaluation by one of our surgeons and in consultation with your primary care physician find out if the technique is appropriate for you.

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